How Late Can a 17 Year Old Work in Kansas?

It’s important to know the labor laws in your state if you’re a teenager. In Kansas, the general rule is that you can’t work past 10pm if you’re under 18. However, there are some exceptions to this rule. If you’re 16 or 17, you may be able to work later if you have a work permit or if your job is considered essential.

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17-year-olds in Kansas: an overview

17-year-olds in Kansas are allowed to work in a wide range of jobs. However, there are some restrictions on the types of jobs they can do and the hours they can work.

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not set any minimum age for employment, so 17-year-olds in Kansas are free to work in most jobs. However, there are some exceptions. For example, 17-year-olds are not allowed to work in jobs that involve operating heavy machinery or working with toxic chemicals.

The FLSA also sets limits on the number of hours that 17-year-olds can work. In general, 17-year-olds can work up to 8 hours per day and 40 hours per week. However, there are some exceptions to this rule. For example, 17-year-olds who work in certain jobs (such as lifeguards or grocery clerks) may be able to work up to 10 hours per day and 48 hours per week.

It’s also important to note that the FLSA’s limits on hours only apply to jobs that are covered by the act. Some jobs (such as babysitting or lawn mowing) are not covered by the FLSA, so 17-year-olds can work these jobs for any number of hours per day and week.

In Kansas, the legal working hours for 17-year-olds are:

-8 hours per day
-40 hours per week
-6 days per week

There are no restrictions on the number of hours that a 17-year-old can work in a week, but they cannot work more than 8 hours in a day.

Exceptions to the general working hours rule for 17-year-olds in Kansas

Kansas does not have any special exceptions to the general working hours rule for 17-year-olds. 17-year-olds in Kansas may work:
-8 hours per day
-40 hours per week
-6 days per week

There are, however, a few exceptions to this rule. 17-year-olds in Kansas may work:

Jobs that are off-limits for 17-year-olds in Kansas

There are a few types of jobs that are off-limits for 17-year-olds in Kansas. These include jobs that involve:
-Working in an environment that has been determined to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
-Operating certain types of machinery, such as power-driven recycling machines

In addition, 17-year-olds are also not allowed to work in certain kinds of jobs where they would be exposed to potentially harmful situations, such as:
– Working in coal mines
– Working in logging operations
– Working with explosives

Working during school hours in Kansas

Students who are 17 years old may work during school hours in Kansas if they have written permission from their school district superintendent or their designated representative. The written permission must state the hours the student is allowed to work, the days of the week the student is allowed to work, and whether the student is allowed to work during study hall or lunch period.

Night work for 17-year-olds in Kansas

In Kansas, there are no curfew restrictions for 17-year-olds who are employed. They can work as late as they want, as long as their job doesn’t involve serving alcohol.

Kansas’ Child Labor Law

Kansas’ child labor law states that any person under the age of 18 cannot be employed for more than 8 hours in a day, or 40 hours in a week, unless the minor is employed during a summer vacation from school or has been graduated from high school.

There are some exceptions to this law. If a youth is 16 or 17 years old, he or she may work up to 9 hours in a day, or 48 hours in a week. If the minor is working with his or her parents, he or she may work any number of hours. The following occupations have different standards:

-Aviation: ground crew and operations personnel must be at least 18 years old
-Coal mining: no one under the age of 18 can be employed
-Construction: no one under 18 can work on scaffolding more than 10 feet off the ground
-Farm work: no one under 16 can operate dangerous machinery such as tractors, and those under 18 cannot work in silos, grain bins, and other confined spaces; youth 14 and 15 years old can only work outside school hours and not more than 3 hours on a school day, 18 hours in a week when school is in session, or 40 hours when school is not in session
-Manufacturing and processing: no one under 16 can operate power-driven machines

Enforcement of Kansas’ Child Labor Law

The Child Labor Program is responsible for enforcing the child labor laws of Kansas. These laws are designed to protect working youths by setting minimum age and hour standards.

The Child Labor Program is a part of the Department of Labor’s Division of Industrial Relations. The Child Labor Officer investigate complaints, conducts child labor inspections, and provides educational information about the child labor laws to employers, parents, and youth.

The Kansas Child Labor Law (KCL) prohibits any person under the age of 14 years from being employed in any occupation, except in domestic service or certain agricultural jobs not hazardous to health or safety. KCL also prohibits the employment of persons under 18 years in hazardous occupations and limits the hours that persons under 16 years may be employed. Hazardous occupations are those determined by the Secretary of Labor to be particularly dangerous to the life, limb or well-being of workers under the age of 18.

Penalties for violating Kansas’ Child Labor Law

The Kansas Child Labor Law establishes the minimum age for employment and sets standards for the maximum number of hours and times of day that minors may work. The law also requires employers to maintain certain records for employees under 18 years of age.

Violations of the Child Labor Law are considered infractions. An infraction is a non-criminal offense that is punishable by a fine only. The maximum fine for an infraction is $500.

In addition to any other penalty provided by law, any employer who violates the Child Labor Law may be subject to a civil penalty of not more than $1,000 for each violation. Each day on which a violation occurs or continues shall be considered a separate violation.

Civil penalties collected pursuant to this section shall be remitted to the state treasurer in accordance with the provisions of K.S.A. 75-4215, and amendments thereto. Upon receipt of each such remittance, the state treasurer shall deposit the entire amount in the state general fund.”

Resources for more information on Kansas’ Child Labor Law

The Child Labor Program is responsible for enforcing child labor laws. The major federal child labor provisions are found in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). However, some states have enacted their own child labor laws that are more stringent than the federal law.

In Kansas, children under the age of 14 may not be employed except in certain specified non-manufacturing, non-mining, non-hazardous jobs. Permissible jobs for 14- and 15-year olds are more limited than for older workers and are generally confined to retail establishments, offices, restaurants and other service occupations; delivery and messenger services; theatres; gas stations; agriculture; and any work not prohibited by state or federal law. Children 16 years old and over may be employed in any job not prohibited by state or federal law with the following exceptions:

Children under the age of 17 may not be employed in any manufacturing or mining occupation.

Children under the age of 18 may not be employed in any occupation declared hazardous by the Secretary of Labor. A complete list of hazardous occupations can be found in Appendix A to 29 CFR Part 570 – Child Labor Regulations, Orders and Statements of Interpretation.

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