What Is the Minimum Wage in Kansas?

The minimum wage in Kansas is $7.25 per hour. This means that employers in Kansas cannot pay their employees less than $7.25 per hour.

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The Federal Minimum Wage

The Federal Minimum Wage is $7.25 per hour. Kansas has not made any changes to this amount, so the Federal Minimum Wage is also the Kansas Minimum Wage. You can be paid less than the minimum wage in certain circumstances, such as if you are a tipped employee or if you are a student or disabled worker.

The State of Kansas

The state of Kansas has a storied past, and its economy has seen a lot of growth and development over the years. The minimum wage is one of the most important aspects of the state’s economy, and it has been the subject of much debate in recent years. Kansas is currently one of a handful of states with a minimum wage that is lower than the federal minimum wage.

The Kansas Minimum Wage

The Kansas minimum wage is $7.25 per hour, which is the same as the federal minimum wage. The minimum wage applies to all workers in Kansas who are covered by the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). This includes all full-time and part-time employees, regardless of whether they are paid hourly, daily, weekly, salary, commission, or piece rate. Some workers may be exempt from the minimum wage requirements, such as certain agricultural workers, student workers, and tipped employees. The Kansas Department of Labor has additional information about which workers are exempt from the minimum wage.

The Kansas minimum wage applies to most workers in the state, but there are some exceptions. For example, agricultural workers and student workers may be paid a lower minimum wage than other workers. tipped employees may also be paid a lower minimum wage if their tips plus wages add up to at least the standard minimum wage. The Kansas Department of Labor has more information about these and other exceptions to the state’s minimum wage laws.

Employers must pay their employees at least the Kansas minimum wage for all hours worked. If an employer pays its employees on an hourly basis, then overtime must be paid for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek at a rate of 1.5 times the regular hourly rate. If an employer pays its employees on a salary basis, then overtime must be paid for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek at a rate of 1.5 times the regular hourly rate. The regular hourly rate is determined by dividing the employee’s total salary by the number of hours worked in a workweek.

If an employee is not paid at least the Kansas minimum wage for all hours worked, then the employee may file a claim with the Kansas Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division to recover unpaid wages. The claims process is free of charge to the employee and can be done online or by mail/fax/in person.

The Kansas Minimum Wage for Tipped Employees

As of July 1, 2020, the minimum wage for tipped employees in Kansas is $2.13 per hour. This hourly wage must be at least 70% of the state’s minimum wage for all other workers, which is currently $7.25 per hour. If an employee’s tips plus the hourly wage does not equal at least the minimum wage for all other workers, then the employer must make up the difference.

The Local Minimum Wage in Kansas

The minimum wage in Kansas is $7.25 per hour, which is the same as the federal minimum wage. Kansas does not have any laws that require employers to provide paid sick days, vacation days, or holidays. However, some employers may offer these benefits to their employees.

The Wichita Minimum Wage

The Wichita Minimum Wage is the minimum wage for the city of Wichita, Kansas, as set by the Wichita City Council. The current minimum wage is $8.65 per hour, which was last increased on July 1, 2019. The Wichita Minimum Wage applies to all businesses within the city limits of Wichita, regardless of size or type of business.

The Kansas City Minimum Wage

The minimum wage in Kansas is $7.65 per hour for most workers, with a few exceptions. Tipped workers must be paid at least $2.13 per hour, and workers under the age of 20 may be paid $4.25 per hour for the first 90 days of employment. The minimum wage for workers who receive medical benefits is $5.50 per hour.

The City of Kansas City has its own minimum wage ordinance, which currently sets the minimum wage at $13.00 per hour for most workers. The minimum wage will increase to $15.00 per hour on August 24, 2020.

How the Minimum Wage Is Set in Kansas

The minimum wage in Kansas is $7.25 an hour. Kansas’s minimum wage is the same as the federal minimum wage.

The minimum wage in Kansas is set by the Kansas Minimum Wage Act. The Act provides that the minimum wage will be adjusted each year on January 1st to reflect changes in the cost of living, as measured by the Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers (CPI-U).

If there is no increase in the CPI-U, then the minimum wage will remain the same. If there is an increase in the CPI-U, then the minimum wage will be increased by that amount.

The CPI-U for 2017 was 2.1%, so the minimum wage in Kansas will increase to $7.40 per hour on January 1, 2018.

How the Minimum Wage Affects You

The minimum wage in Kansas is $7.25 an hour, which is the same as the federal minimum wage. Many people are affected by the minimum wage, including workers, families, businesses, and the economy. The minimum wage can help workers afford basic needs, but it can also lead to higher prices for goods and services.

If You Receive the Minimum Wage

If you receive the minimum wage, you are likely to spend most of your earnings on basic necessities, such as housing, food, and transportation. This leaves little room for other expenses or savings. In addition, you may have to work longer hours just to make ends meet.

The minimum wage may also have a negative impact on your health. A study by the University of Washington found that workers who earned the minimum wage were more likely to have chronic health problems, such as obesity and high blood pressure. They were also more likely to report being in poor health overall.

If You Earn More Than the Minimum Wage

If you make more than the minimum wage, the law does not require your employer to pay you any additional amount. You are still entitled to all the other rights and protections under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Your employer may not take action against you because you make more than the minimum wage. If your employer does take such action, you may have a legal claim against your employer.

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