What is the Minimum Wage in Kansas for 2020?

The minimum wage in Kansas is $7.25 per hour. This means that employers in Kansas cannot pay their employees less than $7.25 per hour.

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Introduction

As of January 2020, the minimum wage in Kansas is $7.25 per hour. This is the same as the federal minimum wage and has been in effect since 2009. There are some exceptions to this rule, however, such as for tipped employees and those under the age of 20.

The Federal Minimum Wage

The Federal minimum wage is the hourly pay that most workers in the U.S. are legally entitled to receive. The current federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour, which has been in effect since 2009. Although federal law sets the minimum wage, each state is free to set its own minimum wage that is higher than the federal level. In fact, 29 states (and Washington, D.C.) have minimum wages that are higher than the federal level.

The state of Kansas has a minimum wage that is equal to the federal level of $7.25 per hour. However, some cities in Kansas have enacted their own minimum wage laws that are higher than both the state and federal levels. For example, the city of Wichita has a minimum wage of $8.65 per hour, and the city of Lawrence has a minimum wage of $9.00 per hour.

The State of Kansas Minimum Wage

The following table describes the current minimum wage rates in the state of Kansas as of July 2020. The minimum wage is the lowest hourly rate that employers can pay their workers. workers who are covered by the federal Fair labor Standards Act (FLSA) must be paid at least the federal minimum wage, which is $7.25 per hour. However, some states have enacted their own minimum wage laws that set a higher hourly minimum wage rate than the federal rate. in these states, workers must be paid the higher state minimum wage rate.

-The State of Kansas Minimum Wage is $7.25 per hour.
-The Federal Minimum Wage is $7.25 per hour.
-Some states have enacted their own minimum wage laws that set a higher hourly minimum wage rate than the federal rate.
-In these states, workers must be paid the higher state minimum wage rate.

The Local Minimum Wage in Wichita, Kansas

The Local Minimum Wage in Wichita, Kansas is $7.25 per hour effective January 1, 2020.
The State of Kansas does not have its own minimum wage laws, so the Federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour applies.
The Wichita City Council voted on August 12, 2019 to raise the minimum wage within the city limits to $8.60 per hour effective January 1, 2020, with annual adjustments for inflation starting in 2021.

How the Minimum Wage is Determined

The minimum wage in Kansas is $7.25 per hour. The minimum wage is the lowest hourly pay that can be awarded to workers, legally mandated by the government. In some states and jurisdictions, the minimum wage is higher than $7.25 per hour.

The federal government first established a national minimum wage in 1938 during the Great Depression, as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal legislation. The original federal minimum wage was 25 cents per hour (equivalent to $4.18 in 2019). Since then, the federal minimum wage has been raised numerous times, most recently in 2009 to its current level of $7.25 per hour. The federal minimum wage applies to all workers in the United States, regardless of what state they live in.

Some states have their own minimum wage laws that are higher than the federal minimum wage. As of January 2020, 29 states plus Washington D.C., Puerto Rico, and Guam have set their minimum wages above the federal level; Kansas is not one of these states. In those states where the state and federal minimum wages differ, workers are entitled to receive the higher of the two wages.

The Impact of the Minimum Wage

The minimum wage in Kansas is $7.25 per hour, which is the same as the federal minimum wage. The minimum wage in Kansas was last increased on January 1, 2009.

The minimum wage in Kansas impacts approximately 111,000 workers, or 5.4 percent of the state’s workforce. Of those affected, 55 percent are women and 45 percent are men. The vast majority of workers who would be impacted by an increase in the minimum wage to $15 per hour are adults over the age of 20 (88 percent).

Raising the minimum wage would also have a ripple effect on workers who make just above the new minimum. Because wages tend to flow upwards when the bottom rung is raised, an estimated 522,000 additional workers would see their wages increase if the minimum wage were raised to $15 per hour.

The Impact of the Minimum Wage on Women
Women are disproportionately affected by changes in the minimum wage. In Kansas, 55 percent of workers who would be impacted by an increase in the minimum wage to $15 per hour are women. Low-wage women are also more likely to be single parents or heads of household than their male counterparts. In fact, nationally, nearly one in four working mothers would benefit from a federal $15 minimum wage by 2025, compared to less than one in five working fathers.

The Pros and Cons of the Minimum Wage

Since its inception in 1938, the federal minimum wage has been a controversial topic. Supporters argue that it helps reduce poverty and provides a safety net for low-income workers. Opponents assert that it increases costs for businesses, leading to higher prices for goods and services and fewer job opportunities.

The current federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour, although some states have enacted laws that provide for a higher minimum wage. For example, as of 2020, the minimum wage in Kansas is $7.65 per hour.

There are pros and cons to the minimum wage debate. Some of the arguments in favor of increasing the minimum wage include:

-It would help reduce poverty by increasing the incomes of low-wage workers.
-It would provide a boost to the economy by putting more money into the pockets of people who are likely to spend it quickly.
-It would decrease dependence on government assistance programs such as food stamps and housing subsidies.
-It would increase worker productivity by reducing turnover and absenteeism rates.
Some of the arguments against increasing the minimum wage include:

-It would lead to job losses as businesses strive to offset the increased labor costs by cutting other expenses such as benefits or hiring fewer workers.
-It would increase prices for goods and services, resulting in inflationary pressure on families who are already struggling to make ends meet.
-It would put small businesses at a competitive disadvantage relative to larger businesses that can better absorb the increased labor costs.

The Future of the Minimum Wage

The Federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour, however many states have enacted legislation to raise the minimum wage above the Federal level. As of July 2020, 29 states have a minimum wage that is higher than the Federal minimum wage. Of those states, 20 have enacted legislation that will gradually increase the minimum wage each year until it reaches a specified target amount.

The State of Kansas has a minimum wage of $7.25 per hour, which is the same as the Federal minimum wage. The State of Kansas does not have any current plans to raise the minimum wage in the near future.

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