What Time Is the Eclipse in Kansas?

The total eclipse will first be visible in Kansas at 1:06 p.m. CDT on August 21, 2017. It will then travel northeast across the state.

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When is the eclipse?

The eclipse is on August 21,2017. It will start at 1:08 pm and will last for 2 minutes and 40 seconds.

The date of the eclipse

The date of the eclipse is August 21, 2017.

The time of the eclipse

On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe inspiring sights – a total solar eclipse. This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun’s tenuous atmosphere – the corona – can be seen, will stretch from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun’s disk.

In Kansas, the eclipse will begin at 11:37 am CDT as a partial eclipse. The moon will start to cover the sun from the northwest corner of the state. Totality begins at 1:06 pm CDT when the moon entirely blocks out the disk of the sun. The total eclipse will last for 2 minutes and 41 seconds. At 2:41 pm CDT, totality ends and partial eclipse resumes. The partial eclipse ends at 4:09 pm CDT.

How long will the eclipse last?

The total eclipse in Kansas will last for 2 minutes and 40 seconds. The moon will completely block out the sun, allowing the bright solar corona to be visible. This is an amazing opportunity to see a phenomenon that is not visible to the naked eye.

The duration of the eclipse

In Kansas, the duration of the total eclipse will be about 2 minutes and 40 seconds.

The path of the eclipse

The path of the eclipse will begin in Oregon and travel across the United States to South Carolina. The whole eclipse will last about two hours and forty minutes, but the duration of totality (when the sun is completely covered) will vary depending on your location. In Kansas, totality will last for about two minutes and thirty seconds.

What can I expect to see during the eclipse?

The total eclipse will last for 2 minutes and 41 seconds in Kansas. You can expect to see the sky darken and the temperature drop as the eclipse moves over the state. Make sure you have your eclipse glasses handy so you can safely watch the moon cover the sun!

The phases of the eclipse

There are four main phases that occur during a total eclipse of the sun. They are as follows:

First contact (C1): The moon starts to move over the sun’s disk.

Second contact (C2): The moon completely covers the sun’s disk. This is totality.

Third contact (C3): The moon starts to move away from the sun’s disk.

Fourth contact (C4): The moon completely leaves the sun’s disk.

The visibility of the eclipse

In Kansas, the eclipse will begin at 11:37 a.m. Central Time on August 21st. The moon will start to move in front of the sun, and the eclipse will reach its maximum at 1:06 p.m., when the sun will be about 70% covered. The eclipse will end at 2:34 p.m., and the sun will be visible again.

How can I safely view the eclipse?

On August 21, a total solar eclipse will be visible in Kansas. This eclipse will be the first total eclipse visible in the contiguous United States since the total solar eclipse of February 26, 1979. There are a number of ways that you can safely view the eclipse.

The dangers of viewing the eclipse

While the total eclipse will only last for a few minutes, the sun will be partially eclipsed for hours leading up to and following the event. It is never safe to look directly at the sun, even during an eclipse, because doing so can cause permanent eye damage or even blindness.

There are a few ways to safely view the eclipse. One is to use special solar eclipse glasses. These are made with materials that block out all but a very small amount of sunlight, allowing you to look directly at the sun without damaging your eyes.

Another option is to make a pinhole projector. This is simply a piece of cardboard with a small hole in it. You can hold the projector up to the sun, and an image of the eclipse will be projected onto a piece of paper behind it.

Finally, you can also use binoculars or a telescope pointed away from the sun to projected an enlarged image of the eclipse onto a piece of paper. However, you must take care not to point these directly at the sun, as doing so can damage the equipment.

The precautions to take when viewing the eclipse

On Monday, August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will be visible across the entire United States for the first time since 1918. This event has been dubbed the “Great American Eclipse.”

If you are in the path of totality, you will be able to see the moon completely cover the sun. This will happen for a brief period of time (about 2 minutes or less). It is very important that you take proper precautions when viewing the eclipse.

Looking at the sun during an eclipse can damage your eyes. You should never look directly at the sun, even during an eclipse. special eclipse glasses or filters must be used. Regular sunglasses will not protect your eyes.

If you are not in the path of totality, you will still be able to see a partial eclipse. You should still take precautions when viewing the eclipse. Do not look directly at the sun without proper eye protection.

Where is the best place to view the eclipse?

The total eclipse will be visible in a 70-mile-wide path from Oregon to South Carolina. It will first touch the Oregon coast at Lincoln City at 10:16 a.m. PT (1:16 p.m. ET). The eclipse will then travel across the country to South Carolina, where it will make landfall at 2:48 p.m. ET.

The best locations to view the eclipse

There are many factors to consider when trying to decide where the best place to view the eclipse will be. Some people may want to be in the path of totality so that they can experience the full effects of the eclipse, while others may want to be in a location with clear weather conditions so that they can get a good view.

Here are some things to keep in mind when deciding where to view the eclipse:
-The path of totality is a narrow band that runs across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina. If you want to experience the full effects of the eclipse, you’ll need to be in this path.
-The weather conditions on eclipse day will play a big role in how well you’re able to see the event. If possible, try to pick a location with clear skies so that you don’t have to worry about clouds obscuring your view.
-There are many events and festivals happening around the country to celebrate the eclipse. If you’re looking for a festive atmosphere, there are plenty of options to choose from.
-Some locations may be more crowded than others on eclipse day. If you’re not interested in large crowds, try to pick a spot that is off the beaten path.

The worst locations to view the eclipse

There are a few places you definitely don’t want to be during the eclipse. These locations are in the “path of totality” but they have serious drawbacks that make them terrible viewing locations. Trust us, you don’t want to end up in one of these places on eclipse day.

Kansas City, Missouri: This city is right on the border of the path of totality, so it’s a popular spot for eclipse chasers. However, there are two big problems with KC. First, it’s a notoriously cloudy city, so there’s a good chance you won’t even see the eclipse. Second, traffic is going to be a nightmare. The city is expecting over 1 million visitors for the eclipse, and they aren’t prepared for that kind of influx of people. Avoid Kansas City if you can.

St. Louis, Missouri: St. Louis is another city that’s right on the edge of the path of totality, so it will see a partial eclipse. However, like Kansas City, it’s a cloudy city so there’s no guarantee you’ll actually see anything. Plus, traffic will be horrendous and accommodations will be scarce and expensive. Unless you have your heart set on seeing a partial eclipse, there are much better places to view the event.

Nashville, Tennessee: Nashville is yet another city that falls just outside of the path of totality. It will see a Partial eclipse, but again, clouds could spoil the show. In addition, Nashville is expecting over 1 million visitors for the event, so traffic and accommodations will be major problems

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