When Does the Kansas-Nebraska Act Date From?

The Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed by Congress on May 30, 1854. The Act created the territories of Kansas and Nebraska and opened up new lands for settlement. It also repealed the Missouri Compromise, which had banned slavery in these territories. The Act was one of the major events leading up to the Civil War.

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The Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed by Congress on May 30, 1854.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed by Congress on May 30, 1854. The Act repealed the Missouri Compromise of 1820, which had prohibited slavery north of the 36°30′ parallel in the Louisiana Purchase territory. Kansas and Nebraska were both located north of that line. Consequently, the Act opened those territories to slavery.

The Act became law on July 1, 1854.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act was an effort by Congress to open up new territories in the western United States to settlement and economic development. The Act itself was passed by Congress in May of 1854, but it did not become law until July 1st of that year. The Act is named for the two territories that were created by its passage, Kansas and Nebraska.

The Act was proposed by Illinois Senator Stephen A. Douglas.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act was a bill proposed by Illinois Senator Stephen A. Douglas in early 1854. The bill created the territories of Kansas and Nebraska, opened new lands for settlement, and repealed the Missouri Compromise. The Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed by Congress on May 8, 1854, and signed into law by President Franklin Pierce on May 30.

The Act created the territories of Kansas and Nebraska.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed by the United States Congress on May 30, 1854. The Act created the territories of Kansas and Nebraska, opening new lands for settlement and making way for the construction of a transcontinental railroad. The Act was pushed through Congress by Democratic Senator Stephen Douglas of Illinois and was signed into law by President Franklin Pierce.

The Kansas–Nebraska Act of 1854 created the territories of Kansas and Nebraska, opened new lands for settlement, and repealed the Missouri Compromise. The initial purpose of the Kansas–Nebraska Act was to opening new lands in the west for settlement while maintaining a delicate balance of power between pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions in the United States.

The Act repealed the Missouri Compromise.

The Act repealed the Missouri Compromise, which had prohibited slavery in all U.S. territories north of the 36° 30′ parallel, and was seen as a concession to the South. It was designed to appease slave-holding interests in the southern states while allowing western territories to be opened up for settlement by whites. The Act also established Nebraska and Kansas as US territories, to be admitted to the Union as states at a future date.

The Act was opposed by many Northerners.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act was an American law that created the territories of Kansas and Nebraska and was signed into law by President Franklin Pierce on May 30, 1854. The initial purpose of the act was to open up new lands west of the Mississippi River for settlement. However, the Act’s most significant consequence was that it effectively repealed the Missouri Compromise, which had prohibited slavery in all lands west of the Mississippi River with the exception of Missouri. The Act opened up all U.S. territories to slavery, thereby inflaming passions on both sides of the slavery issue and helping to bring about the American Civil War.

The Act led to the formation of the Republican Party.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act was an Act of Congress that opened the Kansas and Nebraska territories to white settlement and repealed the Missouri Compromise. The Act was passed by the 33rd Congress on May 30, 1854, and signed into law by President Franklin Pierce.

The Act resulted in Bleeding Kansas.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed by the U.S. Congress on May 30, 1854. The act created the territories of Kansas and Nebraska, opened new lands for settlement, and repealed the Missouri Compromise of 1820. The act resulted in Bleeding Kansas, a series of violent confrontations over the issue of slavery in the new territories.

The Act was one of the causes of the American Civil War.

The Kansas–Nebraska Act of 1854 (10 Stat. 277) opened Kansas Territory and Nebraska Territory to slavery and future admission as slave states by popular sovereignty. It repealed the Missouri Compromise of 1820 and allowed settlers in those territories to determine for themselves whether slavery would be permitted. The initial intent of many of the bill’s proponents was to settle the long-standing slavery debate by allowing it to play out in practice in the territories rather than through legislation.

The law was written by Democratic Senator Stephen Douglas of Illinois and introduced into Congress in January 1854. The Act was passed by the House on May 22, 1854, over the intense opposition of Whig Party members such as William H. Seward (R-NY) and Zachary Taylor (W-LA), and with strong Democratic support from Northern states and Southern states. The Senate passed it with a 36–16 majority on May 29, 1854; Nebraska Territory’s lone congressman, Democrat Augustus Saunders, voted against passage but was not present for the final vote as he was home in Nebraska with his pregnant wife. President Franklin Pierce signed it into law on May 30, 1854.

Kansas–Nebraska did not solve any problems posed by slavery; rather, it simply renewed them at a more aggravated level because of Bleeding Kansas. The long-term result was that memories of this act played an important role later in American history: anti-slavery Northerners invoked it as a reason why war against the South was necessary during the American Civil War, while pro-slavery Southerners pointed to Northern violations of its provisions during “Bleeding Kansas” as justification for secession from the Union.

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