Where Is Nicodemus, Kansas?

Nicodemus, Kansas is a town with a rich history. Founded by African American settlers in the late 1800s, Nicodemus is the only remaining town of its kind. Today, Nicodemus is a National Historic Site and home to a vibrant community.

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Location of Nicodemus, Kansas

Nicodemus is a city in Graham County, Kansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 153. Nicodemus was founded in 1877 by African Americans as part of the Exodusters movement. It was the only African American town established in the frontier state of Kansas.

Nicodemus National Historic Site is located in the city, and commemorates the history of African American settlement during the westward expansion of the United States in the late 19th century.

History of Nicodemus, Kansas

Nicodemus, Kansas was founded in 1877 by a group of African-American settlers who were looking for a place to build a community where they could live and work in peace. The town was named after Nicodemus, a slave who had escaped from bondage and become a leader of the Underground Railroad.

The town prospered for many years, but began to decline in the early twentieth century as the agricultural economy changed and young people left for opportunities elsewhere. Today, Nicodemus is a National Historic Site, and its restored buildings and cemetery give visitors a glimpse into the life of this once-thriving community.

Demographics of Nicodemus, Kansas

Nicodemus, Kansas is a small town located in the northwest corner of the state. The town has a population of less than 300 people and is more than 90% African American. Nicodemus was founded in 1877 by a group of ex-slaves who were seeking freedom from racial discrimination. The town is now a National Historic Site and is home to several structures that date back to its early years.

Education in Nicodemus, Kansas

Nicodemus is a ghost town in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in western Kansas. It is the only town in the United States that was founded, financed and populated by African-American settlers. The town was founded in 1877, and its population peaked at about 600 in the early 1900s.

Today, Nicodemus is a National Historic Site, and its story is told at the Nicodemus National Historic Site Visitor Center. The center offers exhibits on the history of the town and its people, as well as a research library with genealogical resources.

The town is also home to the Nicodemus School, which serves students in grades K-12. The school is part of the raises Academic Achievement through Rigor and Relevance (AARR) framework. AARR is a research-based approach to education that focuses on providing rigorous and relevant learning experiences for all students.

Economy of Nicodemus, Kansas

In 1877, a group of ex-slaves from Kentucky founded Nicodemus, Kansas, making it the first and oldest African American settlement west of the Mississippi River. The town was named after Underground Railroad conductor Nicodemus Fitzbutler. Despite its historic significance, Nicodemus is now a virtual ghost town, with only about 15 residents left.

The economy of Nicodemus dried up when the railroad bypassed the town in 1887. The Great Depression and Dust Bowl further decimated the population and by the 1970s, only about 100 people remained. Today, Nicodemus is trying to revitalize its economy by attracting tourists to its historic sites and black heritage.

Culture of Nicodemus, Kansas

Nicodemus, Kansas, is the only remaining western town founded by African Americans during the Reconstruction Era. It is located in Graham County, in the northwest corner of the state. The town was established in 1877 by a group of approximately 30 black families who had migrated from Virginia and other states in the East. The settlers purchased land from the federal government and set up a community that soon became known as “New Rome” or “Little Africa.”

The town prospered for several years, but by the early 20th century, many of its residents had moved away, seeking better opportunities elsewhere. Today, Nicodemus is a National Historic Site and home to a small community of friendly residents who are proud of their town’s unique history. Visitors can learn about the town’s founding at the Nicodemus Historical Museum, tour its restored buildings, and enjoy its beautiful prairie setting.

Recreation in Nicodemus, Kansas

Nicodemus, Kansas, is located in the northwest corner of the state, just south of the Nebraska border. The town is situated in a picturesque valley between rolling hills, and is bordered by grasslands and farmland. Nicodemus National Historic Site is the only remaining all-black town west of the Mississippi River and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The town was founded in 1877 by African-American settlers who were looking for a place to build a community where they could live and work in peace and harmony.

There are several recreational opportunities available in Nicodemus, Kansas. Visitors can explore the historic site, which includes the original town site, a museum, and several restored buildings. There are also hiking trails and picnic areas nearby.

Government of Nicodemus, Kansas

The government of Nicodemus, Kansas is vested in a mayor and four city council members, who are elected to staggered four-year terms. The mayor presides over city council meetings, but does not have a vote except in the case of a tie. The councilors each represent one of the four wards into which the town is divided.

Media in Nicodemus, Kansas

Nicodemus, Kansas is a town located in the western part of the state. The town has a population of just over 100 people, and is one of the only remaining all-black towns in the United States. The town was founded in 1877 by former slaves who were looking for a place to call their own.

Today, Nicodemus is a historic site, and visitors can learn about the town’s history at the Nicodemus National Historic Site. The town also has its own newspaper, the Nicodemus Herald, which is published monthly.

Notable people from Nicodemus, Kansas

Nicodemus, Kansas is notable for being the site of the only remaining African American frontier town in the United States. The town was founded in 1877 by a group of ex-slaves who were seeking freedom and opportunity in the American West. Today, Nicodemus is home to a small but vibrant community of African Americans who are proud to maintain their unique heritage and culture.

Notable people from Nicodemus include:

-Georgia Douglas Johnson (1880-1966), poet and playwright
-John Willis Menard (1838-1893), first African American elected to the US Congress
-Langston Hughes (1902-1967), poet and writer

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