Kansas City Here I Come: Who Wrote the Song?

Heading to Kansas City? Make sure to brush up on your history – the city has a lot of it! Who wrote the song “Kansas City” is a question that often comes up. Read on to find out the answer.

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The history of the song “Kansas City”

“Kansas City” is a song written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller in 1952. Originally recorded by Little Willie Littlefield the same year, the song was a hit for Wilbert Harrison in 1959.

Littlefield’s recording was released on Federal Records in 1952, and reached number five on the Billboard R&B chart. A cover version by Wilbert Harrison was released by Fury Records in 1959. His version reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and number ten on the R&B chart.

Harrison’s version featured an arrangement by Belford Hendricks, who used a horn section supplied by members of Ray Charles’ band. The distinctive electric guitar solo was played by Hank Garland. The song is currently in the Grammy Hall of Fame.

The meaning behind the lyrics of “Kansas City”

The song “Kansas City” was written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller in 1952. The lyrics tell the story of a man who is heading to Kansas City to meet a woman.

The song became a hit in 1959 when it was recorded by Wilbert Harrison. It has since been covered by many other artists, including the Beatles and Ray Charles.

The lyrics of “Kansas City” are simple, but they capture the excitement of heading to a new city to meet someone special. The song has become a classic of American pop music.

The significance of “Kansas City” in American music history

American music would not be the same without the influence of “Kansas City.” The song, which was originally written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, has been covered by a wide range of artists over the years.

The song became famous in the early 1950s when it was recorded by big band leader Willie Dixon. Dixon’s version was popularized by a number of other artists, including saxophonist Lester Young and pianist Jay McShann. It wasn’t until 1962 that the song really caught on with the mainstream public, thanks to a version recorded by Wilbert Harrison.

Harrison’s rendition of “Kansas City” topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart for two weeks in 1959 and is widely considered to be one of the greatest recordings in rock and roll history. The song has since been covered by dozens of other artists, including the Beatles, who included their own version on the 1964 album “Beatles for Sale.”

“Kansas City” is just one example of the many songs that have been inspired by America’s heartland. The city of Kansas City has also served as an important cultural touchstone in jazz and blues history. In fact, many of the biggest names in jazz got their start playing in the city’s legendary nightclubs, including Count Basie and Charlie Parker.

The influence of “Kansas City” on later musicians

“Kansas City” is a rhythm and blues song written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller in 1952. First recorded by Little Willie Littlefield the same year, it was also a hit for Wilbert Harrison in 1959.

The song has been recorded by many other artists including The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and Bob Dylan. It has been covered in a wide variety of musical genres including rock, pop, jazz, country, and rhythm and blues.

The influence of “Kansas City” on later musicians has been enormous. The song has been described as “one of the most covered tunes in the history of rock and roll.” It has been credited with helping to launch the careers of several well-known musicians including The Beatles and The Rolling Stones.

The recording of “Kansas City” by Wilbert Harrison

“Kansas City” is a 1952 song written by Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller that was originally recorded by Little Walter. The song reached number one on the Billboard R&B chart in 1952 and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1996. It has been covered by a number of artists, including the Beatles, who recorded it during their 1962 trip to Hamburg, Germany.

Wilbert Harrison recorded “Kansas City” in 1959. His version reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1959 and is considered one of the classic recordings of the rock and roll era. The song features some of the best-known guitar work by Chuck Berry, who also played on several other tracks on the album.

The popularity of “Kansas City” in the United States

“Kansas City” is a popular song written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller in 1952. The song was originally recorded by Little Willie Littlefield the same year and later became a hit for Wilbert Harrison in 1959. Kansas City has been recorded by many other artists including the Beatles, the Grateful Dead, and B.B. King.

The song is about a man who is headed to Kansas City to find a woman who he says has “gone away.” He is hoping that she will return to him when he gets there. Kansas City is known for its blues and jazz music, which may be why the man in the song is hoping to find his woman there.

The legacy of “Kansas City” in American culture

“Kansas City” is a jazz and blues standard written in 1952 by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. The song was originally performed by Little Willie Littlefield and has been covered by many other artists.

The song is significant not only for its place in the history of American popular music, but also for its portrayal of Kansas City as a mecca for jazz and blues musicians. In the years since its release, “Kansas City” has become emblematic of the city itself, helping to cement its reputation as a center for African-American culture.

The cover versions of “Kansas City” by other artists

The song “Kansas City” has been recorded by many artists and has become a standard. The best known version is probably the 1966 recording by Wilbert Harrison, which reached number one on the Billboard pop chart. However, the first recording of the song was done by Little Willie Littlefield in 1952. He recorded it as a jump blues tune, with a piano-based arrangement.

The song was written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, who were two of the most successful songwriters of rock and roll. They wrote hits for Elvis Presley, the Drifters, Ben E. King, and many others. “Kansas City” was inspired by a visit to Kansas City, Missouri, where they saw a sign that said “Kansas City Here I Come”.

The place of “Kansas City” in the history of rock and roll

“Kansas City” is a rhythm and blues song written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller in 1952. First recorded by Little Willie Littlefield the same year, the song later became a hit when it was recorded by Wilbert Harrison in 1959.

Harrison’s version of “Kansas City” reached number one on the Billboard R&B chart and number two on the Billboard pop chart. It was ranked number 504 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time and is included in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. The song has been recorded by many other artists including The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and Bob Dylan.

“Kansas City” as an iconic American song

“Kansas City” is an iconic American song that has been covered by a wide range of artists over the years. The song was originally written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller and was first recorded by Little Willie Littlefield in 1952. However, it was The Beatles’ 1964 cover version that really brought the song to mainstream attention.

Despite its name, “Kansas City” is actually set in Kansas City, Missouri, which is also known as KCMO. The city has a long musical history and has been home to a number of famous jazz and blues musicians. It is also known for its barbecue and its friendly Midwestern hospitality.

If you’re ever in KCMO, be sure to check out the Jazz District, which is home to a number of iconic jazz venues. And if you’re feeling hungry, make sure to try some of the city’s famous Kansas City-style barbecue!

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